Posts by spatzi

    What a find! As if the first album wasn't rare enough, here is something even more obscure! Sounds great. I"m currently playing a few songs from Automatic Man in my acoustic set, and it's great to hear a new gem from those sessions. Thanks! :clapper:

    I bought 'Hughes/Thrall' while working in the Sears record dept back in 1982. I was totally into Pat Travers for years, so when I heard Thrall was on this disc, I had to have it. I remember bringing it back to the store, and cranking it up so all the customers could hear 'Got your number'. I played it endlessly, and loved every track. It's truly a desert island album, and my favorite lp of Glenn's, and probably a tie with Thrall's first 'Automatic man' lp. I eventually learned every song on guitar and did cover of 'got your number', 'coast to coast', 'Hold out your life', 'Who will you run to' (doing this in an acoustic duo right now with my wife).

    I'll post a live version I did of 'I got your number' with a female singer from a few years back. It has a full band on it.

    The remaster is great, and the two new song fit right in. I still have the original lp but I admit that the remaster sounds slightly better.

    I love the Feel album, which I bought while living in Hamburg in 1995. My faveorite track was 'talkin to messiah', which I finally covered with my band last year. Our singer actually met Glenn a month after this video in NY while seeing his show there, and showed him the vid, to which Glenn replied, "You rock!"

    [ame='http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JntYdFwKjDI']YouTube- Talkin' to messiah by Shatner's hairpiece - Live at the Yale[/ame]

    This album is so underrated, and overlooked, due to the 'Iommi' solo tage, and bad promotion. In spite of Glenn being in bad physical shape at the time, his vocals are great, and there isn't a dud on this album. I actually listen to this more than the Dio albums or anything post Hughes in Black Sabbath. It's heavy but still very melodic. This album is much better than the last album Hughes did with Iommi a few years ago, which just sounded like every song recycled the riffs from the previous one.

    'Hold out your life'. Not only for the dynamics, but this is the first time I really heard Hughes deliver that 'scream' right before the solo. Still gives me the shivers. Loved the guitarwork, and this was the best solo on the Hughes/Thrall album.

    It's a real shame Pat doesn't play more. I'm always amazed at how some players are just road warriors, like Pat Travers, and will probably be 70 and still touring. It goes in phases. I got into work so much at one point, I didn't touch guitar for five years, but then the desire to play came back. Probably happen to Pat as well.

    Here's a clip of my wife and myself playing the classic song from the first 'automatic man' album called 'right back down'. I always loved this album and it hold up extremely well today. The good old days when albums were meant to be taken 'whole' and had no filler. What's also interesting is how many of Thrall's riffs from this album ended up on the 'hughes/thrall' album years later, such as the opening of 'Hold out your life' which was originally the opening riff for 'automatic man'.

    I'm playing a mix of the guitar and bass parts here on a Parker limited edition (18 of 25) Autumn burl mojo. I love this guitar! No effects added to guitar or vocals. We'll probably cover 'Here am I now' off 'visitors' next. We will be playing these songs live at gigs, and you can bet they don't come any more obscure than this!

    [ame='http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-NN26U_ViiY']YouTube- Right back down - Robin and Susanne - Acoustic duo[/ame]

    Yes, I remember reading how Thrall was totally into the Police and Summers sound. The Hughes/Thrall track 'First step of love' even sounds like Copeland is playing on it. Everyone was influenced by the Police in the late 70's, early 80's, including Michael Shreive, who had a band that practically modelled themselves after the Police, including a singer that sounded like Sting. Shrieve wasn't happy with that band for that reason.

    Gary Moore cites favorite players as Pat Thrall, Jeff Beck, Neal Schon. Least favorite player: Jimmy Page. I remember reading how impressed he was with 'hughes/thrall' album and it must have increased his desire to work with Hughes. I also remember reading that Moore thought Hughes' version of 'still the night' on the Phenomena album was atrocious.

    I have to agree with Thrall about the nobody cares if you can play or not. Very sad. I grew up in the 70's, when it was important to be able to play, and solos had to be good. I feel like a dinosaur now, and it's really depressing to see the crap bands that show up nightly on Letterman, filled with people who can't sing, write, or play. Hey look, it's Justin Beiber! How embarrassing must it be to be an adult musician playing in Beiber's band? The mind boggles at the state of music today. I'm just glad I grew up in the sixties so I was at least exposed to good music WHILE it was happening. Regardless, I still play in a band and duo and I'm not about to give it up.

    Pat Thrall is really hard to get a hold of these days. I used to talk to him by email abou ten years ago, and sent him some audio of 'muscle and blood' that my wife and I recorded, but that old studio email is long gone. Amazing how very little of Thrall shows up on a google search. He does not even have a web site.

    I've got the 'cookin mama' album and I have to say, while there are a couple 'showcase' tracks for Thrall, most of it sounds like really dated hippie music, and is nowhere near the quality of his later output with automatic man. I think Thrall's playing took a big leap between 'cookin mama' and the first 'automatic man' album, as he was no doubt woodshedding with more fusion/jazz players or just generally praciticing a lot.

    I look forward to hearing this instructional records after I get my posts in!